How Long, O LORD?

Posted by on Mar 14, 2010 in Uncategorized | No Comments

WOW! This speaks to the process or the Great Adventure that we are on in this life. I keep referring to this long-term process that defines the process of healing associated with most people who battle against same-sex attraction issues. Most want an immediate instantaneous zap from GOD. Though the LORD may do that very thing in some cases, my experience has been that it is a long-term process of healing and spiritual maturation.

Please don’t misunderstand me here. Though I believe in this process I do not mean to say it is a miserable burdensome process. Though it is not easy (does dying to self – DEATH to self – sound like fun & easy?) and it is on-going, it is also glorious and the reward is worth EVERY moment of the battle. We have been created by GOD and for GOD and He is calling us to an eternal destiny. This world is not our home. I am longing for my true home – that eternal destiny – and it has already begun.

It has been through this journey that the LORD is teaching me more about WHO He is and who I am in Christ. It has been through this journey that I am coming to learn (not so much intellectually but spiritual learning in my heart and spirit) about what it means to have an authentic intimate love relationship with GOD as opposed to simply being religious or simply being a typical Christian caught up in law and works and striving.

PLEASE READ THE DEVOTIONAL BELOW by John Elderedge

I THANK GOD FOR THE WONDERFUL PROCESS AND JOURNEY! It is all for His glory!

Truly, truly, GOD is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in Him! – Piper

Resting in Him,
Richard Holloman

March 14, 2010
“How Long, O Lord?”
When God comes to call Jeremiah to be his prophet of hard sayings to Judah, Jeremiah protests, saying, “‘Ah, Sovereign LORD . . . I do not know how to speak; I am only a child.’ But the LORD said to me, ‘Do not say, “I am only a child.” You must go to everyone I send you to and say whatever I command you. Do not be afraid of them, for I am with you and will rescue you,’ declares the LORD” (Jer. 1:6–8).

God is saying that these things will be done through Jeremiah’s dependence on his strength and provision, and that he will rescue him. Yet there is something about God’s rescues that make them a little less timely than dialing 911. He leaves Abraham with his knife raised and ready to plunge into Isaac’s heart, and Isaac waiting for the knife to descend; he leaves Joseph languishing for years in an Egyptian prison; he allows the Israelites to suffer four hundred years of bondage under the Egyptians and leaves those same Israelites backed against the Red Sea with Pharaoh’s chariots thundering down on them. He abandons Jesus to the cross and does not rescue him at all. And then there are those of us who, along with the saints under heaven’s very altar, are groaning under the weight of things gone wrong, waiting for that same Jesus to return and sweep us up with him in power and glory. “How long, O Lord?” we whisper in our weariness and pain.

Indeed, God calls us to battles where the deck appears stacked in favor of those who are his enemies and ours, just to increase the drama of the play. And there is the clear picture, even from God himself, that he does so to enhance his own glory.

(The Sacred Romance , 55)

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